Karen McCormick for Congress

Karen McCormick Karen has been a resident of Longmont, CO for over 22 years and is married to a native Coloradan, Gregg. During her 33 year career as a veterinarian, she owned and managed a veterinary hospital that employed 24 people and grew to grossing over $2 million a year. Her husband owns an auto repair shop in Longmont and works as a broker for business owners to sell their businesses. As a business owner, Karen understands and has experienced the challenges and rewards it entails. Karen started her veterinary career at the University of Florida, working in Florida and Virginia before settling in Colorado. It’s here she raised three daughters, Kendall, Camryn and Erin, all young adults now.

Karen grew up in a Navy family. Her father was a fighter pilot whose career included serving as the Captain of the USS America and retiring as a Rear Admiral after proudly serving for over 30 years. Relocating every year or two as a child gave her an invaluable education through the experience of seeing and being able to appreciate so much of this great country. Such an upbringing instilled in her a deep understanding of what it means to be an American.

Karen has two siblings, an older and younger brother. Her older brother Glenn was also a Navy fighter pilot and now flies for American Airlines. Her younger brother Chris is an entrepreneur who started and successfully ran an aerospace company based in Golden, Colorado and continues to work in the satellite field. Her mother is an active and energetic citizen of Longmont.

Involvement in volunteer work has been an important part of service to the community for Karen. She has been a board member for 9 years with Project V.E.T.S, a nonprofit dedicated to saving the planet one animal at a time. She volunteered and was a board member with Vidas, a nonprofit that holds large scale spay and neuter clinics and educational outreach in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. She is currently a volunteer English language teacher for Intercambio – Uniting Communities, where she teaches English to immigrant community members. She has also served as a communications coach in the Veterinary Teaching Hospital at Colorado State University, where she helps to train the next generation of Colorado veterinarians.

The passion Karen has for Colorado and her country has driven her to speak up, to stand up, and run for office.

Dave Young, Candidate for State Treasurer

DaveYoungRep. Dave Young has been a state representative since July 2011, representing east Greeley, Evans and Garden City.

On November 1st, Rep. Young announced his candidacy for State Treasurer.  The election for this office will be in November 2018.

Over the past three years, Rep. Young has served as chair of the House Appropriations Committee and as a member of the Joint Budget Committee.  Before that, he served as vice chair of the House Public Health and Human Services Committee, and as a member of the House Education Committee, the House Health, Insurance and Environment Committee, and the House Transportation Committee.  He served as co-chair of the 2013 Flood Disaster Study Committee and was a legislative member of the Community Living Advisory Group.

During his time in the Colorado legislature, he introduced and passed the Advanced Industries Accelerator Act.  He was also the prime sponsor of a bill to cut business personal property tax on over 30,000 small Colorado businesses.   In addition, he passed legislation for Medicaid payment reform.

This past 2017 session, he passed 15 bills including the Long Bill (the state’s budget bill).   Many of his bills were focused on reforming Medicaid and long-term services and supports for seniors and people living with disabilities.

Other policy areas include:

  • Reforming school finance, student testing and assessment systems, and online education
  • Improving public safety in regards to drunk and impaired driving
  • Integrating behavioral and mental health systems with primary care to achieve better health outcomes
  • Improving budget accountability and the funding of essential services for Coloradans

Before his work as a legislator, Dave was a senior instructor for the Information and Learning Technologies program at the University of Colorado Denver.  Prior to that, he was an information architect for a large Web services company. Rep. Young started his career as a junior high math, science and technology teacher.  Dave has lived in Greeley for over 40 years and is a native Coloradan.

Rep. Young earned his MA in Information and Learning Technologies from UC Denver in 2000, and his BS in Mathematics from Colorado State University in 1975.

Dave is married to Dr. Mary Young, a school psychologist for Centennial BOCES.  Dave’s sister, who is developmentally disabled, lives in Pueblo West.

Rep. Young is committed to public service and community involvement. In addition to being an Advocate for Life for the Donor Alliance, he worked as a trail maintenance volunteer for the Poudre River Trail. To learn more, visit www.RepDaveYoung.com and www.facebook.com/StateRepresentativeDaveYoung.

Indivisible at 1

One year ago, we didn’t set out to tell people to have hope. We set out to tell people they have power. And with that power, you gave an entire country hope and showed them resisting the Trump agenda was possible.

Today’s the first anniversary of this movement and we’re celebrating you. We have a lot of fun things in store on Facebook and Twitter to show our gratitude, and we can’t wait for you to see them. But first, we want to share a message and a video we made to commemorate the brilliant work you’ve done this year.

Greeley Indivisible Meeting Dec 13, 2017

JOSEPH SALAZAR, CO State Representative
Joe Salazar
GUEST SPEAKER AT GREELEY INDIVISIBLE MEETING
Joe is a champion for the environment and will talk about the bills he will introduce during the 2018 Colorado Legislature related to Oil and Gas regulations. He will also advise on how to make verbal or written comments during Legislation.
Also, Learn Facts on Democratic Caucus, Assemblies and Primary
Wednesday
December 13th at 6:00 – 8:00 pm
JOE MOLINA GALLERY
930 8th Ave
Greeley, CO
For more information, contact greeleyindivisible@gmail.com

Trish Zornio – Exploring US Senate 2020

Trish Zornio

A forward-thinker by all standards, Trish firmly believes America exists on a precipice of opportunity with the potential to embrace some of the largest economic and social advances in history. She envisions that with smart investments in green technologies, education, science, medicine, and more, America has the potential to be global leaders in building a future for the future. From the latest research, Trish realizes the necessity that America adapt rapidly to an ever-changing and mobile world by working to create new sustainable jobs, infrastructure, educational opportunities, social justices, and marked improvement in a work-life balance for all American citizens (e.g. eliminating the need to work multiple jobs just to pay the bills and living paycheck to paycheck). Additionally, she is an avid advocate for policy which maximizes the opportunities for all Americans, and is passionate to fight for the values of her friends, family, and fellow Coloradans.

Trish lives at her home in Superior, Colorado and is a biomedical researcher and speaker by training. She is currently penning her first non-fiction book on her political convictions and values, and additionally serves as a Board Advisor for the 500 Women Scientists Youth Pod in Boulder County, the Principal Director of CoMusica (a community music program she founded in 2013), and as Lead Coordinator for 314 Action Colorado Chapter, a nonprofit aimed at transitioning scientists into policy. She also leads a STEM Outreach initiative for the Colorado State Democratic Party, partnering legislators with experts for policy research and development. Trish has previously worked at the University of Colorado Boulder, Denver Health Hospital, and the Stanford University School of Medicine, most recently working on a National Institutes of Health (NIH) funded study to solve rare and undiagnosed diseases. As a scientist who passionately believes in applying evidence-based solutions to policy, Trish is actively exploring a bid for the U.S. Senate in Colorado, 2020.

Don’t Believe the “Tax Reform” Hype

By Julie Garbus, Greeley Indivisible Co-founder

Gobble gobble.

That’s the sound of the corporations and super-rich gloating over the proposed “tax reform” making its way through Congress. The rest of us? We’re the turkeys.

The Republican leadership in Congress assures voters that their tax plan will help the middle class. And it’s true that many people will pay somewhat lower taxes—for a while. But this plan really isn’t about the middle class. It’s about giving a windfall to huge corporations, whose tax rate will plummet from 35% to 20%. Companies get several other perks under the plan as well. Republicans say that slashing corporate taxes will result in better pay and benefits for workers. But in the past, when corporate taxes have been cut, corporate executives and shareholders profited the most. Workers gained little.

Here’s how the version of the bill that passed the House would affect a typical northern Colorado household making about $45,000-70,000 a year–the middle fifth of the US population. In 2018, most households would save about $800. They’d save only $310 in 2027, though. That’s because a credit helping moderate-income families expires in 2023; also, the bill changes the way inflation is calculated in a way that will push earners into higher tax brackets sooner than under current law. The bill eliminates most itemized deductions—including those helping students afford college and graduate school. That could negatively affect northern Colorado towns with universities, such as Boulder, Fort Collins, and Greeley—and towns near universities, like Longmont, as well. Deductions for high medical expenses disappear under the plan, too.

The top 1% of earners? They’ll save 3.1% of their pre-tax income– about $54,000 in 2018 and $62,000 in 2027. They’ll benefit from the repeal of the estate tax, enabling them to pay no taxes on money they pass on. The bill also makes it easier for rich people to dodge taxes because it removes the alternative minimum tax, put in place to discourage tax avoidance.

The centerpiece of the Senate bill, like the House version, is the same tax cut for multinational corporations, along with other perks for them. The corporate tax cut is permanent. As with the House bill, most people’s taxes would go down for a while. But here’s the problem: after 2025, the individual tax cuts completely disappear. Faced with a rule prohibiting increasing the deficit beyond a certain amount, senators showed where their allegiances really are: they kept the corporate tax cut and nixed the individual one. After 2025, households making $75,000 or under will pay higher taxes than they would under our current system. Filers making more than that, though, will still pay less.

This plan will increase the deficit by up to 1.7 trillion. The Republicans pushing the bill say the tax cuts will pay for themselves because they’ll spur the economy so much. Virtually all economists disagree. In fact, a real-life test of this theory happened in Kansas several years ago. Republican governor Sam Brownback drastically cut corporate taxes and income tax rates, promising amazing economic growth. The result was catastrophic. Everything decreased, not increased: state revenues, its bond rating, funding for essentials like education and infrastructure. The legislature reversed the tax cuts, but the state’s still struggling with its budget gap.

Congress is counting on moderate and low-income people being short-sighted and gullible. They’re counting on people happily pocketing their short-term savings, forgetting that in 10 years their taxes will go up. They’re counting on people believing that the bill was designed to help them, not huge companies and the very rich. Don’t believe the hype.

Cary Kennedy – Candidate for Governor

Cary KennedyAs Colorado’s State Treasurer and Denver’s Deputy Mayor and Chief Financial Officer, Cary is widely known for her financial expertise and extensive qualifications. She reformed Colorado’s and Denver’s finances by ending risky Wall Street investments; putting us on a more solid financial foundation before and despite the historic recession and pushing for more transparency. She has been on the forefront of fighting for education for Colorado’s kids, including crafting the BEST program that has funded the renovation and replacement of more than 380 crumbling schools across Colorado and authoring Amendment 23 that protects education funding.

Cary is running for governor to make sure we have a public education system that ensures that every Colorado student, by the age of 19, regardless of where they live and how much their family makes, is ready for higher education, a career, or both. She has offered a plan with a public option to help make health care more affordable and accessible. And she will fight to protect the Colorado we love. For more information about Cary and her campaign please visit www.carykennedyforgovernor.com.

GOP Tax Reform is Anti-GOP

Pundits have been talking up the lowering of tax rates for the ultra-rich and making that the prime focus of explaining it. However, the central theme of previous Republican Party theory has been reducing the national debt, through balancing the budget, and the goal of never having a deficit. That has been their mantra that appeared as the reason for tax reduction to corporations, small businesses and individuals. Puff — that central theme is gone — the smoke entrails only hint that some Republicans even remember their core beliefs. Curtailing spending, reducing taxes and balancing the budget would eventually reduce the debt, and the country would be healthy again. Of course, we progressives differ on what kind of spending should be cut, and who needs tax relief, but for the moment, our focus is on the dishonesty of making false promises, or to be blunt, lying.
Giving mass tax relief to the super wealthy while at the same time raising the debt ceiling by nearly two trillion dollars would have been unthinkable in previous administrations, either Republican or Democratic Congresses. The donors of the Republicans apparently have upped their goals toward ownership of the United States, rather than simple majority rule. The march toward a different form of Constitutional government is underway — be wary of brains that bounce to the goose stepping of oligarchs.